What Dreams May Come, and How They Fly

What Dreams May Come, and How They Fly 

What Dreams May Come, and How They Fly

What Dreams May Come, and How They Fly is a 5 x 10 foot linear steel sculpture with mosaic elements that is located in the southern perimeter of Roberto Clemente Park along Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard. The title of the sculpture comes from a poem by renowned black author, playwright and poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, who has served as inspiration for the Dunbar community of Fort Myers for more than 90 years.

The sculpture depicts the silhouetted heads of two African American adults, one male and the other female, as well as one child. Embedded in these plasma-cut steel silhouettes are brightly-colored yellow, orange and red fused glass pieces that, taken together, make a metaphorical statement. As is true everywhere, the fabric of the Dunbar Community is a mosaic of the collective dreams, aspirations and, yes, disappointments of its individual members.

Artist: Cheryl Foster

Cheryl Foster is a multi-media artist specializing in large-scale public art. A graduate of Howard University and Master Artist in Residence with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Cheryl designs and executes visual arts programs integrated with local content standards. She can be found along the east coast throwing paint, welding metal, sculpting and painting with stained glass. Knee-deep in color, she works with communities, art councils, architects, and developers, enhancing environments. She was selected in 2014 by the City of Fort Myers Public Art Committee for the Dunbar project from a national field of 67 applicants.

Cheryl Foster